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Bath Salts Detox & Treatment in Ontario

Bath salts are a form of synthetic cathinone and are a psychoactive Definition of the word psychoactive stimulant drug. Natural cathinones are produced from a plant in Africa, and the synthetic drugs are manmade and far more potent and dangerous. The manufacturers of these drugs routinely change-up the chemical compounds to avoid using illegal chemicals. The stimulant is chemically similar to cocaine or methamphetamine and is sold illegally throughout Ontario. Bath salts are unpredictable because of the chemical compounds being used. Even someone who uses this type of drug even once will be at risk for serious harm. People struggling with bath salt drug addiction in Ontario should be seeking out help and treatment for their drug problem.

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These types of drugs affect the brain in different ways by releasing neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. Synthetic cathinones are not a new drug being used and were popular in Europe before they became popular in the United States and Canada. The effects of these drugs are very apparent and have the potential to create dangerous psychoactive effects. For example, people who use bath salts will experience extreme paranoia, anxiety, will feel agitation or violent behavior, and increased sociability similar to cocaine. Someone who uses bath salts is also at risk of experiencing hallucinations, which has the potential to lead to violent outbursts.

There have been cases where these drugs have led to suicidal tendencies and drug users trying to hurt other people. The combination of anxiety, delirium, and hallucinations have been the direct result of this. The person using bath salts will experience pleasure and euphoria since synthetic cathinones release dopamine. The effects of these drugs happen right away and can last for hours amplifying the psychosis. The amount of dopamine that is being released into the brain is ten times greater than that being released by cocaine. The excessive dopamine being released will create the intense hallucinations the drug user experiences.

Some of the physical side effects caused by bath salts include elevated body temperature, rapid heartbeat, and breathing, increased blood pressure, dilated pupils, and sweating. Drug users will also experience nausea, dehydration, nosebleeds, shortness of breath, dizziness, and muscle twitches and shaking. These types of drugs are cheap and easily accessible, especially by young people within the province. Younger adults tend to abuse these drugs because of that very reason. Bath salts are commonly abused recreational drugs and are often mixed with other drugs such as alcohol, marijuana, or even prescription drugs. The purpose of mixing synthetic cathinones with other drugs is to amplify the effects of these drugs.

Anyone struggling with a bath salt addiction in Ontario can access the private and government-funded programs in the province. Synthetic cathinone addiction is often part of a larger drug problem that involves other drugs. The rehabilitation process will start with detox to help the addict make it through the withdrawals. Once detox is complete, the best form of treatment is inpatient drug rehab centers, such as long-term treatment. However, not every form of addiction requires long-term inpatient treatment, and most recreational drug users will turn to outpatient drug rehab or short-term programs for help. It is important to find the right type of treatment for a bath salt addiction because the problem will become worse.

The information below will help you on how to find a bath salts outpatient program in Ontario. The list could be incomplete, so if you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us at 1-877-254-3348.

List of outpatient treatment facilities in Ontario

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Sylvain Fournier

Sylvain Fournier | Bio

Across Canada, there are many different treatment options to choose from, private, government-funded, inpatient, and outpatient. See More