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Our phone line is staffed by knowledgeable rehab specialists ready to assist you. From 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM, Monday to Friday, and all day Sunday, a specialist from DRS will answer your calls. Outside these hours, your calls will be handled by a rehab specialist from “Together We Can,” a treatment facility in BC, ensuring you receive support whenever you need it.

Fentanyl Detox and Treatment Centers in Newfoundland and Labrador

Last updated on: Tuesday, 5 March 2024

When searching for a drug rehab center in Newfoundland and Labrador for fentanyl addiction, it must offer detox, therapy, and aftercare support. Fentanyl addiction differs for each person, and drug rehab should be tailored to meet individual needs. Each type of drug needs a specific detox setting, either conventional or medical. Below, you will find a listing of medical detox in Newfoundland for fentanyl addiction, including facilities with accreditations and licensures such as Canadian Accreditation Council.

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List of Fentanyl Detox Centers

The information below will help you on how to find a fentanyl medical detox program in Newfoundland. The list could be incomplete, so if you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us at 1-877-254-3348.

Date of Review: 18 September 2023

Charles J. Andrew Youth Treatment Center empowers Aboriginal families through the provision of a holistic healing program. After examining the website, we found that the center is a ten-bed residential…

Rehab Settings

– Assessment
– Detox
– Medical Detox
– Outpatient
– Residential
– Residential Long-Term
– Substance Abuse Treatment

Services Offered

– Drug Prevention and Education
– Holistic
– Substance Abuse Counselling
– Substance Abuse Counselling for Families
– Substance Abuse Counselling for Individuals
– Substance Abuse Group Counselling

People Served

– Adolescents
– Family Programs
– Family Support
– First Nation

Accreditations

– Canadian Accreditation Council
– Official Canadian Substance Use Treatment Centres for First Nations and Inuit

Medical Staff: Evelyn Winters, BSW | Clinical Program Manager
Alicia Montague , CAC | Clinical Counselor

P.O. Box 109, North West River, NL

Ask a Professional

  • What is fentanyl?

    Fentanyl is an opioid that is 100% stronger than morphine, heroin, or oxycodone. Illegal fentanyl has flooded the streets, increasing overdose rates. Illicit synthetic fentanyl is mixed into the drugs, which has increased overdose rates.

  • Is fentanyl addictive?

    Yes, fentanyl is addictive like any other opioid. Regular fentanyl uses causes dependence and addiction. In addition, the withdrawal symptoms are quite severe and can include cravings, sweating, runny nose, nausea, stomach cramps, muscle spasms, and chills.

  • What drugs is fentanyl mixed with?

    Fentanyl is commonly mixed with drugs like heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine and made to look like other pain medication, and it is all sold illegally. Fentanyl-laced drugs are dangerous and are a major contributing factor to the increased number of overdose deaths in Canada.

  • What are the signs of a fentanyl overdose?

    The signs of a fentanyl overdose include small, constricted pin-point pupils, falling asleep or losing consciousness, slow, weak, or no breathing, choking or gurgling sounds, limp body, cold or clammy skin, and discolored skin. A fentanyl overdose can be reversed if Naloxone is administered.

  • How do you treat fentanyl addiction?

    Treating fentanyl addiction begins with medical detox to manage withdrawal symptoms, which are painful. Medical detox effectively manages these withdrawal symptoms with other medications. Following detox, the next phase of rehabilitation should involve long-term residential drug rehab. In addition, aftercare support is critical, such as group meetings, sober living, or outpatient treatment.

  • Want to know more?

    The questions from DrugRehab.ca’s “Ask a Professional” are answered by Nickolaus Hayes. If you need further clarification on any of the questions above or have any other questions you can contact him directly at N.hayes@drugrehab.ca.

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